RenalNews: How Eating the Wrong Kind of Protein Could Cause Damage to Your Kidneys – Inflammation

Good Vs. Bad ProteinInflammation is the body’s attempt at self protection; the aim being to remove harmful stimuli, including damaged cells, irritants, or pathogens – and then begin the healing process.

Inflammation contributes to a number of diseases such as kidney disease, heart disease, stroke, and cancer.

Individuals who consume most of their protein from meat, especially red meat, have higher levels of inflammation than those who consume their protein from fish or plant based sources of protein. During the cooking process, high fat and high protein animal foods develop Advanced Glycation End products (AGEs) which contribute to inflammation and degenerative diseases like diabetes – the number one leading cause of kidney disease, and atherosclerosis.

The point is, try to make it a habit to keep your red meat consumption to about twice a week or less, and try to stick to leaner cuts like sirloin, flank, or tenderloin steaks. Importantly, make an effort to promote the intake of vegetable proteins, mainly legumes.

protein

Note that, although a high protein intake has been shown to accelerate kidney damage in people who already have kidney disease, higher protein diets may not adversely affect kidney function in healthy people. Just consume the right kind of protein.

Signs of inflammation include:

Pain: caused by chemicals that stimulate nerve endings, being released; making the area much more sensitive.

Heat: due to the presence of more blood on the affected area, making it feel hot to the touch.

Redness: occur as capillaries fill up with more blood than usual.

Swelling: due to accumulation of fluid.

Immobility: caused by loss of function in affected area, caused by swelling.

With your support, The Iya Foundation, Inc is confident a feasible early detection, surveillance and treatment program can be established to slow, and possibly prevent the progression of kidney disease in the U.S, and particularly in the African Immigrant Community in the U.S.

Click here to support The Iya Foundation, Inc.

 

RenalNews: Salt – Whether to Restrict From Your Diet or Not

Should I Eat Less SaltIn recent news this week; there has been advice about not having enough salt in your diet. Well, that might work for those who do not have heart disease, high blood pressure or kidney disease. For people with high blood pressure who are at risk for kidney disease or people who already suffer from kidney or heart disease; large population studies do NOT recommend high sodium intake.

If you fit into those categories, the National Kidney Fund stands by our previous recommendations and advises that your health would definitely benefit from restricting sodium to 1500-2000 mg per day. Those with kidney disease and hypertension who are not willing to restrict sodium intake will have to take diuretics and their blood pressure medications will be ineffective or not work as well.

If you do not have hypertension, heart disease or kidney disease, you may be able to safely take in the amount of salt suggested by this study which recommends a daily sodium intake range of 2645-4945 mg,  or about 13,000-24,000 mg of salt daily (2000 mg of sodium=5 grams of salt). It is however important to note that, not everyone is aware he or she has kidney disease; hence you must know yours and your family’s status before you consider it safe to consume high amounts of salt.

For example, your spouse or other family member may have normal blood pressure, no kidney disease and no heart disease and doesn’t need to restrict his/her sodium intake, while you may be someone who benefits from salt restriction as you may have salt-sensitive hypertension. This means, if you increased your salt intake, you would have to take more blood pressure medication. So how does that translate to the dinner table? The point is; for family meals, you would go with low salt recipe options, and avoid lots of processed foods with too much added salt. Home cooking should be low salt. Those at the table who don’t need to restrict their salt intake can feel free to use the salt shaker.

Bottom Line: People at risk for kidney disease or those who already suffer it and those with high blood pressure should limit their sodium intake. Be sure to check food labels to know exactly how much sodium is in each item and be aware of your daily consumption so it doesn’t exceed 2000 mg. This amount of sodium represents 5 grams of salt (sodium chloride) each day, so far from a salt free diet and very tasty.

With your support, The Iya Foundation, Inc is confident a feasible early detection, surveillance and treatment program can be established to slow, and possibly prevent the progression of kidney disease in the U.S, and particularly in the African Immigrant Community in the U.S.

Click here to support The Iya Foundation, Inc.

Keep Calm and Eat Less Salt Red

RenalNews: Medication Misuse- It’s Effect on You and Your Kidneys by Dr. Divine Kebulu, PharmD

Dr KebuluThe month of March is dedicated as the kidney month. It is a time when we are called upon to reflect, and educate ourselves, members of our families and our communities on the significance of the kidney. It is also during this time that we salute and pay tribute to those affected with any form of renal (kidney) disease. First, I will like to use this opportunity to extend a special thank you to the founder of the Iya Project, Iya Bekondo. Your hard work, dedication and sacrifice towards greater awareness of the kidney cannot be ignored. You have indeed touched our lives. My understanding of the importance of the kidney has greatly improved since the day I met you; and you introduced yourself as a kidney transplant recipient.

Yes, I become truly aware of the importance of a healthy kidney when I first met Iya. As a member of the healthcare field, I would have preferred to attribute my knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the kidney to my college training. I do not mean to say that I didn’t learn anything during the years I spent in pharmacy school. There is a famous saying that ‘we go through school but school doesn’t go through us’.

 In continuing awareness and education on kidney disease, we must keep in mind that March is not just a month of awareness on kidney disease, but also a month of loftiness, regeneration, and preparation of a new beginning. It is essentially the period during which we strive to make necessary changes in our lives.

One important change we are called upon during this period is to improve our knowledge on the effects of medications on our kidneys. The kidney’s main function is to eliminate waste products from the body. It is also essential in the control of blood pressure, production of our red blood cells and the balancing of the amount of key electrolytes in the body. When blood flows to the kidneys, sensors within the kidney decide how much water, potassium, sodium, calcium, chlorides and other important electrolytes to excrete. Due to its structure and functioning the kidney is exposed to many potential harmful chemicals. These potentially harmful chemicals can be introduced to the kidneys through certain drugs or medications we consume. Damage to the kidneys by drugs or medications can be determined by the area of the renal system in which the damage occurs.  

Read below for how the misuse of certain drugs/medications could potentially cause damage to specific areas of the kidneys.

 1)     Drugs That Cause Kidney Tissue Damage: If not taken properly, certain medications have the ability to cause structural damage to kidney tissues. Examples of such medications include the following:

  • Antibiotics: Aminoglycoside, Gentamicin, and Tobramycin
  • Lithium salts most often used for bipolar disorder
  • Certain dyes (contrast dyes) used in some imaging procedures
  • Statins (Cholesterol lowering medications) e.g Lipitor (atorvastatin), Zocor(simvastatin), Crestor, Pravachol (pravastatin), Mevacor ( lovastatin). Statins have the ability to cause significant muscle breakdown. The end products of such rapid muscle breakdown can clog the filtering system of the kidney, eventually resulting kidney failure.

2)     Drugs That Cause Obstruction of Blood Circulation In The kidneys (intrarenal circulation): Blood circulation within the kidney is essential for its effective functioning. This circulation is regulated by certain chemicals found in the kidneys; such as prostaglandins. Certain medications can influence the processing of these chemicals when not taken as prescribed or recommended and as such; hinder the circulation of blood in the kidney tissues. A common example is a group of drugs found in almost every home, Non Steroid Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs). These include Motrin (ibuprofen), Advil (ibuprofen), Aleve (naproxen), Aspirin (higher dose); commonly used as pain killers.

3)     Drugs That Affect Blood Volume in the Kidneys: There are certain drugs that function by depleting blood volume. These types of drugs are called diuretics, also known as “water pills”. They are often used to control high blood pressure, reduce edema (swelling of the hands and legs) from congested heart and kidney failure. Excessive use of these drugs can lead to significant low blood volume, thereby decreasing the blood supply to the tissues in the kidney. Examples of such drugs include Lasix (furosemide), hydrochlorothiazide, and combinations of them.

4)     Drugs That Affect the Heart:Some Medications used for heart disease and high blood pressure have as one of their side effect, the ability to weaken the force of contraction of heart muscles (negative inotropic).This effect has the potential to impair kidney function in situations where the heart functioning is already compromised. Examples of such drugs include:

 Beta blockers:

.Coreg (carvedilol)

.Toprol XL (metoprolol succinate)

.Lopressor (metoprolol tartate)

.Monocor (bisoprolol)

 Some calcium channel blockers:

.diltiazem

.verapamil

5)     Miscellaneous: Some other medications have the potential to affect kidney functioning when used in certain compromised conditions. Examples include:

  • ACEI (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors): lisinopril, enalapril, fossinopril, etc.
  • Vasodilator drugs: minoxidil, prazosin, etc
  • Antiviral medications such as those used to treat HIV and AIDS infections

 With your support, The Iya Foundation, Inc is confident a feasible early detection, surveillance and treatment program can be established to slow, and possibly prevent the progression of kidney disease in the U.S, and particularly in the African Immigrant Community in the U.S.

 Click here to support The Iya Foundation, Inc.

 

 

RenalNews: 8 Simple Tips to Help Clean Your Diet So It Is Kidney Healthy

March is National Kidney month, and in the spirit of awareness and education on kidney disease, The Iya Project is taking a step further to encourage you to protect your kidneys and so prevent kidney damage and eventual kidney failure. In this article, you’ll learn how to protect your kidneys using 8 simple tips that will help you clean your diet by taking inventory of your pantry and refrigerator.

 1)     Commit to Whole Grains – Stay Away From Refined Products: Whether it’s in bread, cereal, rice, or pasta, whole grains are a good source of fiber and can be found in most grocery stores. Fibers can reduce cholesterol and may also lower your risk for heart disease. Whole grains have the tendency to make you feel full with fewer calories which can therefore also help with weight control. Examples of whole grain products include wheat bread and pasta, brown rice, steel cut oats, and bran flake cereal. Avoid refined grain products.

2)     No Salt Canned Foods: Reducing salt in your diet can help prevent or control high blood pressure and so further reduce your risk of kidney disease. Therefore, when buying canned foods make sure to read the labels for the ‘no salt added’ or ‘low sodium’ varieties of your canned products.

3)     Buy Fresh Fruits and Vegetables: Preferably and whenever possible, buy fresh fruits and vegetables instead of canned foods. Processed foods contain higher levels of sodium (salt) and phosphorous which can be bad for your kidneys if consumed in excess. However, if you have to buy canned fruits/vegetables, choose those with their own juices instead of those in heavy syrup as heavy syrup can raise your blood sugar levels (diabetes is the number one leading cause of kidney failure). Always read your labels and avoid foods that contain ‘phos’ as an ingredient.

4)     Use Spices for Flavor Instead of Salt and Fats: Rather than using salt and fats to add flavor in your meals, use spices and herbs to add flavor. High salt and fat diets can increase your blood pressure and cholesterol. Avoid or minimize salt and fats in your meals.

5)     Eat Lean – Avoid Red Meats: Limit or replace red meats with leaner, lower fat protein choices such as fish, poultry (chicken, turkey, fowl), egg whites, and legumes. Avoid processed meats like ham, hot dogs, sausage, and bacon.

6)     Avoid Processed Sweets: Instead of having processed sweets which can be high in sugar, sodium, carbohydrates and calories, opt for fruits as snacks or desserts. A fruit salad is a great way to consume a variety of nutrients, or a fruit parfait with low fat yogurt.

7)     Avoid Saturated Fats: Replace butter and margarine in your meals with olive or canola oils which are liquid plant oils that are rich heart-healthy unsaturated fats which may lower cholesterol and also ‘possibly benefit blood sugar levels’.

8)     Limit Dairy Fat: Although dairy products provide many important nutrients that are good for you, they can be high in saturated fats and cholesterol. Substitute varieties of milk, cheese, and yogurts hat are high in fat for fat free or lower fat varieties. Substituting with lower varieties can help keep your cholesterol levels healthy.

 With your support, The Iya Foundation, Inc is confident a feasible early detection, surveillance and treatment program can be established to slow, and possibly prevent the progression of kidney disease in the U.S, and particularly in the African Immigrant Community in the U.S.

 Click here to support The Iya Foundation, Inc.

 

RenalNews: Five Health Insights You Can Learn From Your Urine: What Your Pee Says About Your Health

UrineUrine is a byproduct of the kidney’s complex filtration system. The kidneys are important organs with many functions in the body including producing hormone, absorbing minerals, filtering blood, and producing urine. Therefore before you flush down valuable health information down the drain, get better acquainted with your urine; and your body’s normal reactions to different foods and medications and when it’s a critical condition that requires medical attention. Continue reading for the top 5 ways urine can reveal important information about your kidneys, as well as your overall health.

  • Dark Color to Your Urine: The color of your urine could determine if you are dehydrated or not. If your urine is dark yellow; and in less quantity than usual; it could be that you are dehydrated. Being dehydrated affects the concentration of wastes in the urine, and it is likely to appear more yellow, darker, and the urine in lesser quantity. Dehydration can cause kidney stones because it allows for stone-causing minerals to concentrate and settle in the kidneys and urinary tract. You want to make sure your urine is clear; and one of the best measures to do that and avoid dehydration and kidney stones is to drink plenty of water. Although this will require you to urinate a lot, it will help in flushing your system and prevent you from dehydration.
  • Plenty of Bubbles in Your Urine: Having a lot of bubbles in your urine may sometimes mean you have protein in your urine; meaning your kidney is not filtering right. Protein in the urine is an early marker for kidney damage, and one of the earliest signs to determine kidney damage. During your annual physical, make sure to ask your health care provider for a urinalysis. Especially if you’re at increased risk of kidney disease. Remember, you’re at increased risk if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or a family history of kidney failure.
  •  Sweet Smell to Your Urine: If your urine has a sweet smell to it; it may be indicating the presence of sugar. When there is too much sugar in the bloodstream, and the body isn’t processing it effectively; the kidneys begin to work overtime to try and remove it from the body. Sugar in the urine can indicate diabetes or pre-diabetes, so it is important to get additional blood testing for diabetes. Diabetes is the number 1 leading cause of kidney disease and kidney failure. Even pre-diabetes can damage the kidneys, therefore it is important to receive a diagnosis and treatment after such indication.
  •  Cloudy And A Strong Odor To Your Urine: Cloudy or blood tinged urine, a strong odor to the urine, usually accompanied with an urgency to urinate, and a burning feeling when urinating are all symptoms of a urinary tract infection (UTI). A UTI occurs when bacteria (germs) get in the urinary tract and multiply. Bacteria usually enters the urinary tract through the urethra; the tube that carries urine out of the body. If a UTI is not treated promptly, bacteria can move up to the kidneys and can cause a more serious type of infection. Always check your urine for signs of a UTI. 
  • Blood in Your Urine: A pink hue to your urine could be as a result of many things ranging from your food intake to critical conditions such as the presence of red blood cells in your urine. Consult with your doctor or health care provider if you notice abnormal changes in your urine output.

 Certain foods such as asparagus, beet or foods with beet based dyes; can impact the appearance and scent of your urine, as well as medications and supplements. It is very important to pay attention to whether your urine changes coincide with any dietary changes; and be able to recognize your body’s normal reactions. Urine can offer clues into your health, but it is critical to know when to follow up with your health care provider to obtain the necessary testing and diagnosis.

 With your support, The Iya Foundation, Inc is confident a feasible early detection, surveillance and treatment program can be established to slow, and possibly prevent the progression of kidney disease in the U.S, and particularly in the African Immigrant Community in the U.S.

 Click here to support The Iya Foundation, Inc.

 

#NationalKidneyFoundation

RenalNews: What You Need to Know About Alcohol and Your Kidneys

Whether it’s while watching sporting events, at parties, during dinner, or just to unwind; the consumption of alcohol beverages has increasingly become part of many people’s diets. It is therefore important and wise that you consider your kidneys when deciding whether or not to drink alcohol. The following are a few things to keep in mind when drinking alcohol:

  • Unwanted weight gain which can potentially lead to, or worsen diabetes: Diabetes is the number one leading cause of kidney failure. Alcohol can cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), hence it is advisable to not drink alcohol on an empty stomach; or when our blood sugar might be low. Although most people with diabetes are able to moderately include alcohol in their diets, they must inform their doctor before doing so, and it must be done responsibly.
  • Medication interaction: Certain medications may have interactions with alcohol. If you’re on any medications, whether prescription or over the counter, it is important that you speak to your doctor or pharmacist before consuming alcohol.
  • Over working the kidneys: Your kidneys work hard to keep you body healthy and in a balanced state. Excessive consumption of alcohol can affect your kidney’s abilities to maintain you fluid, electrolyte, and acid-base balance. Alcohol can also have a negative impact on the hormones that control kidney function, as well as increase your blood pressure. High Blood Pressure is the second leading cause of kidney failure.
  • Drink responsibly and in moderation: The key in consumption of alcohol is moderation. According to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, it is recommended to those who decide to drink that; women should have n more than one drink a day, and men should cap their intake at two drinks a day. The following is a guideline of one drink:
  1. Beer: 12 Fluid ounce 355 millilites)
  2. Wine: 5 Fluid ounces (148 milliliters)
  3. Distilled Spirits (80 proof): 1.5 Fluid ounces (44 milliliters)

 With your support, The Iya Foundation, Inc is confident a feasible early detection, surveillance and treatment program can be established to slow, and possibly prevent the progression of kidney disease in the U.S, and particularly in the African Immigrant Community in the U.S.

Click here to support The Iya Foundation, Inc.

RenalNews: High Blood Pressure and Kidney Disease

February is Heart Disease Awareness month, and The Iya Foundation, Inc is spreading awareness about High Blood Pressure and kidney disease, as well as the importance of health management to prevent these chronic health conditions.  High Blood Pressure is the number 2 leading cause of kidney failure; following diabetes which is the # 1 leading cause of kidney failure.

Blood pressure is when pressure is formed in the arteries due to blood being pumped through them and the veins. When blood pressure is checked, it tells how hard the heart is working to pump your blood. High blood pressure also called hypertension occurs when the heart is working harder than normal to pump blood in the body.  This is bad for the body and can damage the tiny filters in the kidneys.  When that happens, it could lead to kidney disease and consequently, kidney failure.  High blood pressure can also be caused by many things, including kidney disease.

Although anyone can develop High Blood Pressure, you are at increased risk if you:

Although some of the risk factors such as age, family history, and race can’t be changed, factors such as weight can be controlled. These kinds of simple healthy changes can help you prevent or control High Blood Pressure and help protect your kidneys.

Symptoms of High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure usually has no symptoms. The only way to know for sure is to be checked.   Your doctor can check your blood pressure in the office, or you can check your blood pressure at home using a digital blood pressure monitor.  In certain situations where the blood pressure is extremely high, the individual may experience severe headache, fatigue or confusion.

For most people a normal blood pressure is less than 120 over 80 or “120/80.”  If either number is high, your blood pressure is high.  Ask your doctor what your blood pressure should be.  Also ask your doctor how often you should check your blood pressure.

The following steps can help individuals with high Blood Pressure control their disease and prevent or delay complications:

  • Learn About High Blood Pressure. High Blood Pressure is serious because it can damage your heart, blood vessels, kidneys, and nerves
  • Know Your Numbers. Ask your doctor what diabetes and high blood pressure target numbers are best for you. Learn about your A1C, blood pressure, and cholesterol numbers (known as the ABCs of diabetes) and  the following ABCs of Heart disease A: Take aspirin as directed by your health care provider, B: Control your blood pressure,
    C: Manage your cholesterol, S: Don’t smoke
  • Manage Your High Blood Pressure and Diabetes. Keep track of your numbers, be active on most days of the week, eat healthy, and don’t smoke
  • Get Regular Care. Contact your health care team if you have any questions or problems as you manage your high blood pressure, diabetes, medicines, or supplies

 Ways to prevent kidney Disease:

  •  Get Tested. Early detection saves lives; it could delay kidney failure and possibly prevent kidney failure. Talk to your doctor about being tested for diabetes, high blood pressure, and kidney disease. Many patients with kidney disease never have any symptoms until it is too late. Ask your doctor to perform a blood and urine test for kidney disease
  •  Eat right. Eat food low in fat and cholesterol. Eat foods that are high in fiber; and limit how much alcohol you drink
  •  Live healthy. Exercise, keep a healthy weight, don’t smoke or use tobacco, and treat bladder and kidney infections fast
  •  Manage diabetes and high blood pressure. Diabetes and high blood pressure cause about 3 out of 4 cases of kidney failure

Think you may have High Blood Pressure or at risk? Ask your doctor about being tested for diabetes, high blood pressure, as well as your kidney functioning.

Already suffering from High Blood Pressure? Talk with your doctor on how to best manage it in order to prevent or slow high blood pressure kidney disease and eventual kidney failure.

With your support, The Iya Foundation, Inc is confident a feasible detection, surveillance and treatment program can be established to slow, and possibly prevent the progression of kidney disease in the U.S, and particularly in the African Immigrant Community in the U.S.

Click here to support The Iya Foundation, Inc.

 

RenalNews: Diabetes and Kidney Disease

February is Black history month, and The Iya Foundation, Inc is spreading awareness about the increased risk of diabetes and kidney disease in Blacks, and the importance of health management to prevent these chronic health conditions. Blacks are at higher risk of kidney failure because they suffer the most from diabetes and high blood pressure; which are the two leading causes of kidney failure. Diabetes is the number 1 leading cause of kidney failure; causing almost half of all cases in the United States (40%).

Having diabetes means your body has problems with a hormone called insulin. Insulin helps your body use the sugar you eat for energy. When your body doesn’t use sugar the way it should, too much of it stays in your blood, and can be harmful to the filters in your kidneys.

An estimated 4.9million – about 18.7% of all non-Hispanic blacks aged 20 and older have diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes. Blacks are twice as likely to be diagnosed with diabetes (1 in 9 African American adults have diabetes) as non –Hispanic whites and are more likely to suffer diabetes related complications such as kidney failure and lower extremity amputations. As a matter of fact, unmanaged diabetes is four times more likely to cause kidney failure in Blacks than other races and can also lead to serious complications such as blindness, limp amputation, heart attack, and stroke. Sadly over the last 35 years, the number of people with diabetes has doubled.

Considering the fact that almost 1 in 5 Blacks are not insured, it is no doubt that their health care choices or access to health care may be limited, hence giving them that increased risk of complications that come with unmanaged diabetes.

The good news however is that people with diabetes can reduce the risk for these compilations by controlling blood glucose, blood pressure, and blood lipids.

Although anyone can develop diabetes, you are at increased risk if you:

  •  Are over 45 years old
  •  Are over weight
  •  Are African American, Hispanic, native American, or Asian
  •  Have a family history of diabetes
  •  Have high blood pressure

Although some of the risk factors such as age, family history, and race can’t be changed, factors such as weight can be controlled. These kinds of simple healthy changes can help you prevent or control diabetes and help protect your kidneys.

Symptoms of diabetes include:

  •  Feeling tired
  •  Feeling irritable
  •  Urinating more than normal
  •  Being very thirsty
  •  Being very hungry
  •  Unexplained weight loss
  •  Blurred vision

The following steps can help individuals with diabetes control their disease and prevent or delay complications:

  • Learn About Diabetes. Diabetes is serious because it can damage your heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, and nerves
  • Know Your Numbers. Ask your doctor what diabetes target numbers are best for you. Learn about your A1C, blood pressure, and cholesterol numbers (known as the ABCs of diabetes)
  • Manage Your Diabetes. Keep track of your diabetes numbers, be active on most days of the week, eat healthy, and don’t smoke
  • Get Regular Care. Contact your health care team if you have any questions or problems as you manage your diabetes, medicines, or supplies

Ways to prevent kidney Disease:

  •  Get Tested. Early detection saves lives; it could delay kidney failure and possibly prevent kidney failure. Talk to your doctor about being tested for diabetes, high blood pressure, and kidney disease. Many patients with kidney disease never have any symptoms until it is too late. Ask your doctor to perform a blood and urine test for kidney disease
  •  Eat right. Eat food low in fat and cholesterol. Eat foods that are high in fiber; and limit how much alcohol you drink
  •  Live healthy. Exercise, keep a healthy weight, don’t smoke or use tobacco, and treat bladder and kidney infections fast
  •  Manage diabetes and high blood pressure. Diabetes and high blood pressure cause about 3 out of 4 cases of kidney failure

Despite the increased risk of kidney disease and diabetes in African Americans and Africans, type 2 diabetes can be managed as well as prevented or delayed, which can reduce the chance of having other health issues down the road.

Think you may have diabetes or at risk? Ask your doctor about being tested for diabetes, high blood pressure, as well as your kidney functioning.

Already suffering from diabetes? Talk with your doctor on how to best manage it in order to prevent or slow diabetic kidney disease and eventual kidney failure.

With your support, The Iya Foundation, Inc is confident a feasible detection, surveillance and treatment program can be established to slow, and possibly prevent the progression of kidney disease in the U.S, and particularly in the African Immigrant Community in the U.S.

Click here to support The Iya Foundation, Inc.

 

The Iya Project Dialysis Blanket Drive

The Iya Project Blanket Drive

We are embarking on our first blanket drive where we will be collecting blankets for our in-clinic (hemo) dialysis patients. Hemo dialysis is usually a rigorous 3-4 hour treatment, where the patient is connected to a dialysis machine and treatment is being performed. The environment where the treatment is being performed is usually cold especially for the good maintenance of the machines.

Donating a blanket to an ESRD patient on dialysis will not only create warmth from the cold dialysis clinic environment but will also bring warmth in to their hearts as they experience the love from the world through this very difficult time (most patients on dialysis suffer from emotional distress and psychological disorders).

Your donation of only $10 will put a smile on an ESRD patient on dialysis and bring joy to their heart.

Go now to www.theiyaproject.org and hit on the donate button to support us.

The Iya Project Financial Assistance Program

The Iya Project Financial Assistance Program Application for Low Income Uninsured End Stage Renal Disease Patients Available On February 14, 2014

 

On February 14, 2014, The Iya Project Trust will offer applications for our first round of financial aid to dialysis patients through our TIP Financial Assistance Program (TIP–FAP). TIP–FAP provides grants of up to $1000 to low income uninsured Dialysis and Post Kidney Transplant patients.

This initial round of TIP-FAP is being offered to residents of New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, and Washington DC. Click here for more information about TIP-FAP program.

Dialysis is a long and expensive medical treatment and people on dialysis face very tough financial challenges. Post transplant patients also face a lot of challenges providing for the really expensive but needed post transplant anti-rejection drugs.TIP-FAP was created to help alleviate some of the financial stress these patients have to go through.

Click here to support The Iya Project